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National Cemetery Administration

Marietta National Cemetery

Address:
500 Washington Avenue
Marietta, GA 30060

Phone: (866) 236-8159
FAX: (770) 479-9311

Cemetery Map

Kiosk on Site? No

Burial area and rostrum at Marietta National Cemetery.
Burial area and rostrum at Marietta National Cemetery.
 

HOURS

Office Hours: Monday thru Friday 8:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.
Office located at Georgia National Cemetery.

Closed federal holidays.

Visitation Hours: Open daily from sunrise to sunset.

BURIAL SPACE

Marietta National Cemetery is closed to new interments. The only interments that are being accepted are subsequent interments for veterans or eligible family members in an existing gravesite. Periodically however, burial space may become available due to a canceled reservation or when a disinterment has been completed. When either of these two scenarios occurs, the gravesite is made available to another eligible veteran on a first-come, first-served basis. Since there is no way to know in advance when a gravesite may become available, please contact the cemetery at the time of need to inquire whether space is available.

DIRECTIONS FROM NEAREST AIRPORT

The cemetery is located in downtown Marietta. From Hartsfield International Airport, take Interstate 75 North to North Marietta Parkway (Exit 265). Turn left at traffic light and proceed to Cole Street approximately one mile and turn left. Continue on Cole Street for four blocks. Cemetery is at the corner of Cole Street and Washington Avenue.

SCHEDULE A BURIAL

Fax all discharge documentation to the National Cemetery Scheduling Office at 1-866-900-6417 and follow-up with a phone call to 1-800-535-1117.

GENERAL INFORMATION

This cemetery is administered by Georgia National Cemetery located in Canton, Ga.
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FLORAL/GROUNDS POLICY

Cemetery policies are conspicuously posted and readily visible to the public.

Fresh cut flowers may be placed on a grave at any time, but are recommended during the spring and summer months. Metal flower containers are provided and are located at the cemetery entrance. The flower containers will be removed from the grave when the flowers become unsightly. During the mowing season all floral items will be removed on the 1st and 3rd Thursday of every month.

Artificial flowers will be permitted on a grave during the period of Oct. 1 through April 1. Artificial flowers and potted plants will be permitted 10 days before and 10 days after Easter, Memorial Day, and Veterans Day.

During the Christmas holiday season, Christmas wreaths, grave floral blankets and other such floral arrangements will be permitted commencing Dec. and are allowed to remain on a grave through Jan. 20 of each year. Grave floral blankets may not be larger in size than two by three feet.

Floral items and other types of decorations are not permitted to be secured to a headstone.

Permanent planting, statues, vigil lights, breakable objects of any kind, and similar commemorative items are not permitted on graves at any time. These and other hazardous objects will be removed and disposed of by cemetery personnel whenever found on a grave.

Permanent flower containers are only authorized in old burial sections. The Government is not responsible for the safeguarding, maintenance, replacement or return of the container.

Please consult the Director for clarification of any regulation, which is unclear.
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WEAPONS POLICY

VA regulations 38 CFR 1.218 prohibit the carrying of firearms (either openly or concealed), explosives or other dangerous or deadly weapons while on VA property, except for official purposes, such as military funeral honors. Possession of firearms on any property under the charge and control of VA is prohibited. Offenders may be subject to a fine, removal from the premises, or arrest.

HISTORICAL INFORMATION

Marietta National Cemetery is home to one of five monumental masonry archways that originally served as the formal entrance to national cemeteries found in the South. Three are managed by NCA: Marietta, Ga., built 1883; Chattanooga, Tenn., built ca.1880; and Nashville, Tenn., built ca.1870. These Roman-inspired structures are approximately 35 feet high with Doric columns, a pair of ornamental iron gates, and inscriptions above. The two other memorial arches are found at Arlington National Cemetery, built 1879, and Vicksburg National Cemetery, ca. 1880, properties managed by the Department of Defense and National Park Service, respectively.

During the Civil War, forces under the command of General William Tecumseh Sherman moved in and occupied the town. For the next five months, federal troops held the city under siege. In November 1864, troops commanded by Union General Hugh Kilpatrick set the town on fire before embarking on their infamous "March to the Sea."

Originally known as the "Marietta and Atlanta National Cemetery," the Marietta National Cemetery was established in 1866 to provide a suitable resting place for the nearly 10,000 Union dead from Sherman's Atlanta Campaign. Henry Cole, a local merchant who remained loyal to the Union throughout the war, offered land for a burial ground for both Union and Confederate dead. His hope was that by honoring those who had fallen together, others might learn to live in peace. Unfortunately, both sides clung to their bitterness and neither North nor South would accept Cole's offer toward reconciliation. When this effort failed, 24 acres were offered to General George H. Thomas for use of a national cemetery. In 1867 a second offer of land by Cole was accepted and a subsequent purchase of additional acreage in 1870 brought the cemetery to its present size of a little over 23 acres.

The cemetery site was, at one time, the proposed location of the capital of the Confederate States of America. The same Henry Cole who had attempted to donate his land for the national cemetery had refused an offer of $50,000 for the property because he "expected to put it to a better purpose." In recognition of Cole's gift, the government made express provision that a burial plat be set-aside for members of his family. Cole died April 18,1875, and was buried in what is now called the Cole Plot.

Daniel Webster Cole, son of the land donor, lived for many years in the family home across the street from the cemetery. A construction engineer, he drew the first map of the cemetery, which was later the basis for official layouts. The original sections of the cemetery were arranged in concentric circles around a flagstaff with paths radiating through the circles. The first interments were the remains of soldiers who had been buried where they fell. A granite memorial arch at the cemetery gate is inscribed: "Here rest the remains of 10,312 Officers and Soldiers who died in defense of the Union 1861-1865." Marietta National Cemetery was laid out by Union Army Chaplain Thomas B. Van Horne, who also laid out the Chattanooga National Cemetery. One of the national cemeteries constructed between 1861-1869, the design for Marietta National Cemetery was the most ornate and elaborate of its era.

Marietta National Cemetery was placed on the National Register of Historic Places on Sept. 18, 1998.

Monuments and Memorials
Marietta National Cemetery is home to one of five monumental masonry archways that originally served as the formal entrance to national cemeteries found in the South. Three are managed by NCA: Marietta, Ga., built 1883; Chattanooga, Tenn., built ca.1880; and Nashville, Tenn., built ca.1870. These Roman-inspired structures are approximately 35 feet high with Doric columns, a pair of ornamental iron gates, and inscriptions above. The two other memorial arches are found at Arlington National Cemetery, built 1879, and Vicksburg National Cemetery, ca. 1880, properties managed by the Department of Defense and National Park Service, respectively.

A marble obelisk monument dedicated in honor of 20th Army Corps comrades was erected in May 1870.

The Wisconsin Monument was dedicated to the memory of 405 sons of that state who perished during the Civil War. Stotzer and Company of Milwaukee constructed the monument, sponsored by the Wisconsin legislature. The monument was dedicated on Memorial Day in 1925.

The Atlanta Chapter of the Gold Star Mothers organization dedicated the Gold Star Mothers Monument April 24, 1960.

The Pearl Harbor Survivors Association erected the Pearl Harbor Monument on Dec. 7, 1996.
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NOTABLE PERSONS

Medal of Honor Recipients
Corporal Lee Hugh Phillips, (Korean War) U.S. Marine Corps, Company E, 2nd Battalion, 7 Marines, 1st Marine Division (Rein). Korea, Nov. 4, 1950 (Medal of Honor Recipient Memorial Area B Grave 8).

Private Dennis Buckley, (Civil War) Company G, 136th New York Infantry. Peach Tree Creek, Georgia, July 20, 1864 (Section G, Grave 6686).

Others
John Clark, who distinguished himself as a soldier and civil servant, fought in the Revolutionary War and rose to the rank of major general. He served in the House of Representatives 1801-1803, Georgia Senate 1803-1804.

Major General Crump Garvin U.S. Army was buried on Sept. 10, 1990. He served for 38 years.