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National Cemetery Administration

Hampton National Cemetery

Address:
Cemetery Rd. at Marshall Ave.
Hampton, VA 23669

Phone: (757) 723-7104
FAX: (757) 723-0027

Cemetery Map

Kiosk on Site? Yes

The Union Soldiers' Monument at Hampton National Cemetery.
The Union Soldiers' Monument at Hampton National Cemetery.

HOURS

Office Hours: Monday thru Friday 8:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.
Closed federal holidays except Memorial Day and Veterans Day.

Visitation Hours: Open daily from dawn until dusk.

BURIAL SPACE

Hampton National Cemetery is closed to new interments. The only interments that are being accepted are subsequent interments for veterans or eligible family members in an existing gravesite. Periodically however, burial space may become available due to a canceled reservation or when a disinterment has been completed. When either of these two scenarios occurs, the gravesite is made available to another eligible veteran on a first-come, first-served basis. Since there is no way to know in advance when a gravesite may become available, please contact the cemetery at the time of need to inquire whether space is available.

DIRECTIONS FROM NEAREST AIRPORT

The directions from the Norfolk International Airport are: From Norfolk International Airport take Norview Avenue to Interstate Highway I-64 West and proceed through the Hampton Roads Tunnel. Take exit 267 (Hampton University exit) and turn left onto US-60W/VA-143W (Settlers Landing Road) toward Hampton University. Turn left onto Tyler Street at the entrance to Hampton University. Proceed to Cemetery Road (approximately .4 miles) and turn left. You will pass through a Hampton University security check point. Cemetery is located straight ahead.

SCHEDULE A BURIAL

Fax all discharge documentation to the National Cemetery Scheduling Office at 1-866-900-6417 and follow-up with a phone call to 1-800-535-1117.

GENERAL INFORMATION

Under Development 
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FLORAL/GROUNDS POLICY

Cemetery policies are conspicuously posted and readily visible to the public.

Floral arrangements accompanying the casket or urn at the time of burial will be placed on the completed grave. Natural cut flowers may be placed on graves at any time of the year. They will be removed when they become unsightly or when it becomes necessary to facilitate cemetery operations such as mowing.

Artificial flowers and potted plants will be permitted on graves during periods when their presence will not interfere with grounds maintenance. As a general rule, artificial flowers and potted plants will be allowed on graves for a period extending 10 days before through 10 days after Easter Sunday and Memorial Day.

Christmas wreaths, grave blankets and other seasonal adornments may be placed on graves from Dec. 1 through Jan. 20. They may not be secured to headstones or markers.

Permanent plantings, statues, vigil lights, breakable objects and similar items are not permitted on the graves. The Department of Veterans Affairs does not permit adornments that are considered offensive, inconsistent with the dignity of the cemetery, or considered hazardous to cemetery personnel. For example, items incorporating beads or wires may become entangled in mowers or other equipment and cause injury.

Permanent items removed from graves will be placed in an inconspicuous holding area for one month prior to disposal. Decorative items removed from graves remain the property of the donor but are under the custodianship of the cemetery. If not retrieved by the donor, they are then governed by the rules for disposal of federal property.
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WEAPONS POLICY

VA regulations 38 CFR 1.218 prohibit the carrying of firearms (either openly or concealed), explosives or other dangerous or deadly weapons while on VA property, except for official purposes, such as military funeral honors. Possession of firearms on any property under the charge and control of VA is prohibited. Offenders may be subject to a fine, removal from the premises, or arrest.
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HISTORICAL INFORMATION

Hampton National Cemetery is located in Hampton, Va., near Hampton Roads, in the vicinity of where the historic Civil War naval battle between the Confederate Merrimac/Virginia and the Union Monitor iron-clad ships occurred in 1862. The cemetery’s first burials took place in 1862 and the cemetery is among numerous national cemeteries with origins that date to the Civil War.

The great number of sick and wounded soldiers during the Civil War resulted in numerous military hospitals being set up near battle sites. A 1,800-bed military hospital was established at Fort Monroe, near Hampton. Although the Fort Monroe hospital was better staffed and organized than many Civil War hospitals, the mortality rate was high. Consequently, burials at Hampton National Cemetery included many soldiers who died at Fort Monroe and other military hospitals in the vicinity. Although burials began at the cemetery in 1862, it was not classified by the U.S. Government as a national cemetery until 1866. The legal transfer of 4.749 acres for the cemetery did not occur until 1868.

There are 638 unknowns soldiers buried at Hampton National Cemetery--most of them Civil War soldiers who fell in combat and were originally hastily buried on the battlefield. There are also 272 Confederate soldiers buried in a separate section.

Hampton National Cemetery is one of 13 national cemeteries in which World War II prisoners of war are interred. There are 55 German and five Italian POWs buried in the Phoebus Addition section of Hampton National Cemetery, which is a discontiguous tract of the cemetery.

During World War II, on April 14, 1942, a German U-boat, U-85, was sunk by the U.S.S. Roper on April 14, 1942 off of Cape Hatteras. The entire crew was lost and the boat sank to the bottom of the Atlantic Ocean. On April 15, 1942, full military honors were provided for 28 German sailors from U-85 and they were interred at Hampton National Cemetery. The bodies and a few life jackets were all that surfaced after the submarine was sunk. On board the ship, when it sank, was an Enigma decoding machine. The machine was recovered from the ship during a dive in 2001 and is currently on loan from the German government to the Atlantic Graveyard Museum located in Cape Hatteras, N.C.

Through acquisition of additional land parcels since 1862, the cemetery has grown in acreage from its original size of 4.749 acres to its present size of 27.071 acres. Hampton National Cemetery was listed on the National Register of Historic Places on February 26, 1996.

Monuments and Memorials
The Union Soldiers monument is a 65’ tall granite obelisk that was erected through the efforts of Dorothea Dix, the superintendent of women nurses in the U.S. Army during the Civil War. In 1868 Dix transferred ownership of the monument to the United States. The monument inscription reads: "In Memory of Union Soldiers Who Died to Maintain the Laws."

Two small, rusticated granite blocks inscribed "To Our Confederate Dead" are situated near the burial location of 272 Confederates in the cemetery.
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NOTABLE PERSONS

Medal of Honor Recipients
Landsman Michael Cassidy, (Civil War), U.S.Navy. Aboard U.S.S. Lackawanna, in Mobile Bay, Aug. 5, 1864 (Phoebus Section B., Grave 9503).

Coal Heaver James R. Garrison, (Civil War), U.S. Navy. Aboard the U.S.S. Hartford, in Tennessee in Mobile Bay, Aug. 5, 1864 (Phoebus Section B., Grave 9523).

Sergeant Alfred B. Hilton, (Civil War), 4th U.S. Colored Troops, Company H. At Chains Farm, Va., Sept. 29, 1864 (Hampton Section E, Grave 1231).

Seaman Edward Madden, U.S. Navy. Aboard the U.S.S. Franklin in Lisbon, Portugal, Feb. 9, 1876. (Section E, 1014A).

First Sergeant Harry J. Mandy, (Civil War), 4th New York Cavalry, Company B. At Front Royal, Va., Aug. 15, 1864 (Phoebus Section C, Grave 8709).

First Lieutenant Ruppert L. Sargent, (Vietnam Conflict), 4th Battalion, 9th Infantry, 25th Infantry Division, Company B. Hau Nghia Province, Republic of Vietnam, March 15, 1967 (Hampton Section FI, Grave 7596).

Private Charles Veale, (Civil War), 4th U.S. Colored Troops, Company D. At Chapins Farm, Va., Sept. 29, 1864 (Hampton Section F, Grave 5097).

Coxswain David Warren, (Civil War), U.S. Navy. Aboard the U.S.S. Monticello, June 23 to 25, 1864 (Phoebus Section C, Grave 7972).